Admissions, Application Tips, Full-Time MBA, Student Profile or Feature

Darden MBA Students Share Insights on Applying in Round 3

By Maggie Dodson-
darden-mba-students-share-insights-on-applying-in-round-3

Thinking about applying to Darden’s full-time MBA program? In light of the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on resources and testing centers around the globe, Darden Admissions recently rolled out unprecedented changes to its Round 3 application process. Applications will now be accepted through 15 July to allow for extra flexibility in submitted application materials. Beginning 6 April (the original Round 3 deadline), the Admissions team will adopt a rolling admissions process. If you are considering applying, we recommend submitting your application as soon as it’s ready!

For applicants still planning to submit on or near 6 April, register for this Friday’s Application Hotline webinar, hosted by members of Darden’s Admissions Committee.

Find the full details on flexible standardized testing, rolling admissions and more in the press release. You can also tune in to the Experience Darden podcast to listen to Executive Director of Admissions Dawna Clarke share more about the application updates. Dean Scott Beardsley also shared his thoughts on the ground-breaking new process with Poets & Quants. Read the full interview.


Freddy Tovo (Class of 2021) and Gui Vieira (Class of 2021) shared a bit more about their journey to a Darden MBA, and why applying in Round 3 was the right move for them. Check out The Truth About the Round 3 Application Deadline for even more insights on applying in Round 3.

 

Freddy Tovo (Class of 2021)

Hometown:

Mar del Plata, Argentina

What was your pre-MBA job/industry and what led you to apply to business school?

Before coming to Darden, I worked at a fintech company in Germany that provides financial services solutions to underbanked individuals in emerging markets. As part of my role in the strategy and business development team, I had the opportunity to work with the firm’s management and investors to execute multiple fundraising initiatives.

These experiences, made me realize of my desire to transition into the investment banking industry. An MBA would not only facilitate this career switch, but also, accentuate the quantitative rigor and range of qualitative skills — including effective presentation, teamwork and client management — that I have acquired through my career so far.

Where are you headed post-MBA (either job or industry)?
This summer, I will be in New York working for Morgan Stanley’s investment banking division.

Many applicants who are considering R3 are also weighing being early for the next cycle (i.e. applying Early Action/Round 1). How did you think through this?
There are trade-offs of being an R3 applicant when compared to being early for the next cycle. For me, given the certainty in pursing an MBA, I valued having the opportunity to be part of the Class of 2021. Further, I did not perceive the potential to be rejected during R3 as a negative data point on my application for the next cycle.

By comparison to the summer and fall, there are typically fewer admissions-related events in the run up to Round 3. How did you do your research? Any tips?
While there are fewer admissions-related events, Admissions departments still offer different informational sessions. On top of it, these events tend to have fewer participants, which makes for a great opportunity to ask questions one might have about the program.
Finally, current and former MBA students are extremely approachable and are always happy to share their experiences with prospective students. I would highly recommend for any applicant to take the time to speak with at least four or five people that are familiar with the program.

For some candidates, Round 3 is the only time that worked with their schedules. Did you always plan to apply in Round 3?
For me, it was between applying for R3 or the early-stages of the following admission cycle. Once I determined I was applying for R3, I spent a significant amount of time researching which programs to pursue to ensure I would be happy accepting an offer from any of the programs I applied.

Advice for applicants? Or best advice you received?
Schools like to see applicants that demonstrate a genuine interest in its program. Think thoroughly how unique aspects of the program apply to you and make sure to articulate what you can provide to the program.


Gui Vieira (Class of 2021)

Hometown:

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

What was your pre-MBA job/industry and what led you to apply to business school?

Pre-MBA I worked in private equity in Brazil, where I was responsible for developing roll-up consolidation strategies and running a portfolio company in the financial services industry. Several reasons led me to apply to business school, the main ones being my desire to increase my international exposure, improve my general management toolkit, and change careers from private equity to consulting.

Where are you headed post-MBA (either job or industry)?

I am going to work in consulting. I have just signed my summer offer to intern at BCG Dallas for the summer.

Many applicants who are considering R3 are also weighing being early for the next cycle (i.e. applying Early Action/Round 1). How did you think through this?

I considered the pros and cons of each option and ended up deciding that pursuing round 3 was the right move for me.  Once I set my mind on pursuing an MBA that was where my focus was, and I didn’t want to spend one additional year working in Brazil while my mind was somewhere else.

By comparison to the summer and fall, there are typically fewer admissions-related events in the run up to Round 3. How did you do your research? Any tips?

Reaching out to current students and alums was what made the difference for me. That is specially the case if, like me, you are an international student. Hearing from those who know firsthand about a school in which you have interest is the best way to assess fit and check whether your initial assumptions were correct. As usual, the internet is also your friend. Googling and visiting sites such as Poets & Quants can also be very helpful.

Advice for applicants? Or best advice you received?

It is usually worthwhile to have a quick conversation with people who will write your recommendation letters and make sure that they understand the purpose of it. To those who are immersed in the application process, everything can seem quite straightforward, but that’s not necessarily the case for people who are not living this experience.

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